Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
This record contains private information, which has been redacted from public viewing.
Record #: F2021-65   
Type: Report Status: Placed on File
Intro date: 9/14/2021 Current Controlling Legislative Body:
Final action: 9/14/2021
Title: Inspector General's follow-up to audit of delays in providing notice of Sanitation Code violations
Sponsors: Dept./Agency
Topic: CITY DEPARTMENTS/AGENCIES - Inspector General, - REPORTS - Miscellaneous
Attachments: 1. F2021-65.pdf

CITY OF CHICAGO OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL 740 NORTH SEDGWICK STREET, SUITE 200 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60654
JOSEPH M. FERGUSON TELEPHONE: (773) 478-7799
INSPECTOR GENERAL FAX: (773) 478-3949
JULY 29, 2021
TO THE MAYOR, CITY COUNCIL, CITY CLERK, CITY TREASURER, AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO:
The City of Chicago Office of Inspector General (OIG) has completed a follow-up to its September 2019 audit of the Department of Law's (DOL) process for notifying people of sanitation code violations, such as overflowing garbage containers or uncut weeds. Based on the Department's response, OIG concludes that DOL has not implemented corrective actions related to the audit finding.

The purpose of the 2019 audit was to determine the average length of time it took DOL to notify the property owners of alleged sanitation violations, and why, in some cases, the process took more than a year. Our audit found that for sanitation code violations that occurred in 2016 and 2017, DOL notified property owners an average of 289 days—more than 9 months—after the alleged violation. In 63.2% of the cases, DOL sent notices between six and twelve months after the violation; in another 23.8%, it took the Department a year or more to send the notices. During this period, the primary cause for the delay in notification was DOL's backlog of violations. The process was relatively short once staff began work.

Based on the results of the audit, OIG recommended that DOL work with the Department of Streets and Sanitation (DSS) to set a target for the maximum number of days from violation to notification and implement performance monitoring. This target could take into consideration public health and safety objectives on the one hand, and procedural fairness considerations for alleged violators on the other. It could also accommodate situations beyond DOL's control that cause delays. OIG further recommended ways for DOL to address its backlog of violations, including hiring temporary staff or ...

Click here for full text