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Record #: O2022-2994   
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
Intro date: 9/21/2022 Current Controlling Legislative Body: Committee on Special Events, Cultural Affairs and Recreation
Final action: 11/16/2022
Title: Renaming of Clarke House Museum as Clarke-Ford House
Sponsors: Lightfoot, Lori E.
Topic: HISTORICAL LANDMARKS - Miscellaneous
Attachments: 1. O2022-2994.pdf
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY OF CHICAGO
LORI E. LIGHTFOOT
MAYOR










TO THE HONORABLE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO


Ladies and Gentlemen:

At the request ofthe Commissioner of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, I transmit herewith an ordinance authorizing the renaming ofthe Henry B. Clarke House as the Clarke-Ford House.

Your favorable consideration of this ordinance will be appreciated.


Very truly yours

Mayor
ORDINANCE
WHEREAS, the members of the City Council of Chicago wish to recognize, honor and commemorate Bishop Louis Henry Ford's leadership and vision in preserving Chicago's oldest home, known now as the Clarke House Museum, and more commonly known as the Henry B. Clarke House; and

WHEREAS, the historical significance of the Henry B. Clarke House has been acknowledged by the Architect's Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1935, its designation as a Chicago Landmark in 1970, its certification on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and the receipt by the City of Chicago of federal funds in 1977 issued through the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, which funds were used to restore the structure and relocate the Henry B. Clarke House to its present location at 1827 South Indiana Avenue; and

WHEREAS, the history of the Henry B. Clarke House in many ways parallels the history ofthe City of Chicago, having survived, grown and changed throughout the 186 years since the house was built near what is now the intersection of the 16th Street and Michigan Avenue; and

WHEREAS, the house was built in 1836 for Henry B. Clarke, a merchant and former City Clerk of the City of Chicago, and his wife, Caroline Palmer Clarke. The house exemplified the Greek Revival style common throughout the East Coast and Midwest during that time. The land on which the house was built included a historic cottonwood tree that purportedly marked the site ofthe Battle of Fort Dearborn...

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