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Record #: R2021-922   
Type: Resolution Status: Adopted
Intro date: 7/21/2021 Current Controlling Legislative Body:
Final action: 7/21/2021
Title: Tribute to late Frieda Fritzshall
Sponsors: Lightfoot, Lori E. , Silverstein, Debra L., O'Shea, Matthew J., Dowell, Pat, Villegas, Gilbert, Thompson, Patrick D., Hadden, Maria E. , Tunney, Thomas, Smith, Michele, Cappleman, James, Vasquez, Jr., Andre, Reboyras, Ariel, Nugent, Samantha , Austin, Carrie M., Rodriguez, Michael D., Reilly, Brendan, Osterman, Harry, Mitts, Emma, Martin, Matthew J. , Burke, Edward M., Ramirez-Rosa, Carlos, Lopez, Raymond A., Sadlowski Garza, Susan
Attachments: 1. R2021-922.pdf
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY OF CHICAGO
LORI E. LIGHTFOOT MAYOR

July 21,2021










TO THE HONORABLE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO


Ladies and Gentlemen:

1 transmit herewith, together with Aldermen Silverstein, O'Shea, Dowell, Villegas, Thompson, Hadden, Tunney, Smith, Cappleman, Vasquez, Reboyras, Nugent, Austin, Rodriguez, Reilly, Osterman, Mitts, Martin, Burke, Rosa, Lopez and Garza, a memorial resolution honoring Frieda Fritzshall.

Your favorable consideration of this resolution will be appreciated.


Very truly yours

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, The Members of this Chamber were deeply saddened to learn of the death of Frieda "Fritzie" Fritzshall, Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center President and Auschwitz survivor, at age 91; and

WHEREAS, Fritzie was born on August 27, 1929, in Klucarky, Czechoslovakia and was forced with her family into a ghetto in 1944 when German Nazis invaded her town. Fritzie's family was later deported to Auschwitz, a Nazi death camp, where her mother and two brothers were murdered. To survive at Auschwitz, Fritzie pretended to be older than she was and worked as a slave laborer. While on a forced march evacuation from the death camp, Fritzie escaped into a forest and was liberated by Russian troops; and

WHEREAS, In 1946, Fritzie emigrated to the United States and settled in Skokie, Illinois where she was reunited with her father, who had come to the United States prior to the Holocaust; and

WHEREAS, Fritzie became a hairdresser and married her husband, Norman Fritzshall, a World War II veteran who had been a prisoner of war in the Pacific, with whom'she had a son, Steven; and

WHEREAS, Fritzie's call to activism began in the late 1970s when neo-Nazis threatened to march through the streets of Skokie. Among her many accomplishments, Fritzie helped establish the Holocaust Memorial Foundation of Illinois and assisted with efforts to create the Holocaust Education Mandate, the first of its kind in the nation, a law which...

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